jamvega:

Junot Díaz & Peter Sagal: Immigrants, Masculinity, Nerds, & Art [x]

We also have a popular culture which acts as a megaphone for the larger American tendencies towards anti-intellectualism.

kingjaffejoffer:

dayne5150:

Hmm….

dope gif

kingjaffejoffer:

dayne5150:

Hmm….

dope gif

gaksdesigns: Cinemagraphs by Lucajsphotography

PETER DINKLAGE →

slacktory:

Turn your speakers up

theparisreview:

“I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer.”
RIP Gabriel García Márquez

theparisreview:

“I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer.”

RIP Gabriel García Márquez

theatlantic:

Why Don’t Older Americans Want Time Machines?

You want a time machine, don’t you?
Because one in 10 Americans do — at least that’s what they said when Pew Research Center asked what futuristic technology they would like to own.
That’s a notable percentage of people, especially when you consider that survey respondents came up with “time machine,” unprompted, out of every possible future invention they could imagine. (Naturally, flying cars were popular, too.)
The curious thing is that Pew found people’s level of interest in time travel had a lot to do with how old they are. About 11 percent of 30-to-49-year-olds said a time machine was the one futuristic device they’d want to own, but only 3 percent of people older than 65 said so. 
And looking across demographics of the entire study group, people under 50 were way more into time-travel than people older than 50.
Why is that? 
Read more. [Image:  Luke Hayfield, Creative Commons ]

theatlantic:

Why Don’t Older Americans Want Time Machines?

You want a time machine, don’t you?

Because one in 10 Americans do — at least that’s what they said when Pew Research Center asked what futuristic technology they would like to own.

That’s a notable percentage of people, especially when you consider that survey respondents came up with “time machine,” unprompted, out of every possible future invention they could imagine. (Naturally, flying cars were popular, too.)

The curious thing is that Pew found people’s level of interest in time travel had a lot to do with how old they are. About 11 percent of 30-to-49-year-olds said a time machine was the one futuristic device they’d want to own, but only 3 percent of people older than 65 said so. 

And looking across demographics of the entire study group, people under 50 were way more into time-travel than people older than 50.

Why is that?

Read more. [Image: Luke Hayfield, Creative Commons ]

mpdrolet:

The Pond, 2010
Mac Adams

mpdrolet:

The Pond, 2010

Mac Adams

After battles, when equipment is left strewn around, sometimes the forest makes it its own… (via After all our wars, nature wins — Trees growing through and around old guns, helmets, and more [8 pics] | 22 Words)

After battles, when equipment is left strewn around, sometimes the forest makes it its own… (via After all our wars, nature wins — Trees growing through and around old guns, helmets, and more [8 pics] | 22 Words)