theawkwardlifeofapsycho:

Why is this not taught universally.

(Source: sfgifs)

"How do our lives ravel out into the no-wind, no-sound, the weary gestures wearily recapitulant: echoes of old compulsions with no-hand on no-strings: in sunset we fall into furious attitudes, dead gestures of dolls."
William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying (via liquidnight)
nevver:

Design Crush

nevver:

Design Crush

"Solvitur ambulando."
It is solved by walking. (via invisiblestories)

kenyatta:

"The problem is you’ve been told and not told. That’s what I’ve seen while I’ve been here. You’ve been told but none of you really understand. So I’ve decided I’ll talk to you in a way that you will understand. Do you know what happens to children when they grow up? No, you don’t, because nobody knows."

Never Let Me Go (2010)

(Source: guylawrence)

plannedparenthood:

BAYARD RUSTIN (1912-1987)
Bayard Rustin was an openly gay civil rights organizer and non-violent activist. He’s most well known for his work organizing the 1963 March on Washington. In 2013, Rustin was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. We honor him for his activism and commitment to nonviolence, despite being the target of violence and discrimination because of his race and his sexuality.

plannedparenthood:

BAYARD RUSTIN (1912-1987)

Bayard Rustin was an openly gay civil rights organizer and non-violent activist. He’s most well known for his work organizing the 1963 March on Washington. In 2013, Rustin was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. We honor him for his activism and commitment to nonviolence, despite being the target of violence and discrimination because of his race and his sexuality.

"These findings highlight the important role of bacteria in the bidirectional communication of the gut-brain axis and suggest that certain organisms may prove to be useful therapeutic adjuncts in stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression."

Is our microbiome – the ecosystem of bacteria in our gut – running our lives

For more on the subject, see Rob Dunn’s fascinating book The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites, and Partners That Shape Who We Are Today.

(via explore-blog)
Now’s tracking runs headlong into our need to lie—a little! sometimes!—to ourselves. It’s a truism of this era that Facebook statusing and avatar design and Instagram filters have transformed how we self-present: the way we tell other people true and untrue stories about who we are. What’s transformative about Now is how it makes it harder to tell such stories to ourselves. This matters. Small, self-deceptive fictions are a big part of how we operate. Human beings are not totally awesome at distinguishing between the things we’d like to like and do and the things we actually like and do. So while the sexy endgame of “personal digital assistants” and predictive algorithms may lie in science fictive images of perfected machine intelligence and Scarlett Johansson-y singularities, there are some much more prosaic problems to grapple with right now, today: like the accountability and truthfulness that this technology demands of and imposes on us already (via Google Knows You Better Than You Know Yourself - The Atlantic)

Now’s tracking runs headlong into our need to lie—a little! sometimes!—to ourselves. It’s a truism of this era that Facebook statusing and avatar design and Instagram filters have transformed how we self-present: the way we tell other people true and untrue stories about who we are. What’s transformative about Now is how it makes it harder to tell such stories to ourselves. This matters. Small, self-deceptive fictions are a big part of how we operate. Human beings are not totally awesome at distinguishing between the things we’d like to like and do and the things we actually like and do. So while the sexy endgame of “personal digital assistants” and predictive algorithms may lie in science fictive images of perfected machine intelligence and Scarlett Johansson-y singularities, there are some much more prosaic problems to grapple with right now, today: like the accountability and truthfulness that this technology demands of and imposes on us already (via Google Knows You Better Than You Know Yourself - The Atlantic)

What did vary among the accounts was the number of details that had nothing to do with Air Transat Flight 236 at all. After transcribing the memories, the researchers went back and coded statements as “internal” (“directly related to the main event … specific to time and place … conveying a sense of episodic re-experiencing”) and “external” (“factual information or extended events that did not require recollection of a specific time and place,” “tangential … autobiographical details,” editorializing, repetitions, metacognitive claims like “I can’t remember”). They found that passengers with PTSD produced far more external details than those without. This held true for the nonflight memories too: A survivor with PTSD was more likely to surround her nonemotional recollection with semantic data, repetition, and unrelated noise. (via Plane emergency landing psychology study: People with PTSD have irrelevant memories.)

What did vary among the accounts was the number of details that had nothing to do with Air Transat Flight 236 at all. After transcribing the memories, the researchers went back and coded statements as “internal” (“directly related to the main event … specific to time and place … conveying a sense of episodic re-experiencing”) and “external” (“factual information or extended events that did not require recollection of a specific time and place,” “tangential … autobiographical details,” editorializing, repetitions, metacognitive claims like “I can’t remember”). They found that passengers with PTSD produced far more external details than those without. This held true for the nonflight memories too: A survivor with PTSD was more likely to surround her nonemotional recollection with semantic data, repetition, and unrelated noise. (via Plane emergency landing psychology study: People with PTSD have irrelevant memories.)

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!

Where does the smell of rain come from?

If you said “from the sky,” then congratulations! You are hilarious. But it’s a lot more interesting than that. The pungent perfume that accompanies rainstorms carries special chemical signatures, some born from lightning, some from deep within the soil.

And those smells actually have a purpose, like telling plants when it’s time to grow, guiding camels across the desert, and even signaling some fish when it’s time to get “romantic”. 

Take a big whiff, because there’s a science storm a-comin’!