This is what results: A fast-moving, chronological video collage of the photographs, each individual image onion-skin-like transparent, with the glowing, green TV at the perpetual center of the shot. (via When the World Watches the World Cup, What Does That Look Like? - Robinson Meyer - The Atlantic)

This is what results: A fast-moving, chronological video collage of the photographs, each individual image onion-skin-like transparent, with the glowing, green TV at the perpetual center of the shot. (via When the World Watches the World Cup, What Does That Look Like? - Robinson Meyer - The Atlantic)

shrugsbunny:

darkarfs:


This is a gif from the 1993 Hulk Hogan movie Mr. Nanny. And I have one question…why is that guy in the background throwing his dog into the river? 


Oh god it just keeps getting funnier.

shrugsbunny:

darkarfs:

This is a gif from the 1993 Hulk Hogan movie Mr. Nanny. And I have one question…why is that guy in the background throwing his dog into the river? 

Oh god it just keeps getting funnier.

explore-blog:

If you read one thing today, make it this fantastic vintage gem on the art of self-renewal, even timelier half a century later in our age of blind productivity.

explore-blog:

If you read one thing today, make it this fantastic vintage gem on the art of self-renewal, even timelier half a century later in our age of blind productivity.

"A concept is a brick. It can be used to build a courthouse of reason. Or it can be thrown through the window."
Gilles DeleuzeThousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia (via feellng)
slaughterhouse90210:

“Wasn’t that, in the end, what he wanted? To discover how this place worked—not just its outward system of organization, but its inward, private one as well? Its secret machinations, the strings that gestured the puppet. Who was the puppet, though?”—Edan Lepucki, California

slaughterhouse90210:

“Wasn’t that, in the end, what he wanted? To discover how this place worked—not just its outward system of organization, but its inward, private one as well? Its secret machinations, the strings that gestured the puppet. Who was the puppet, though?”
—Edan Lepucki, California

"That could change now thanks to the work of Daniele Quercia at Yahoo Labs in Barcelona, Spain, and a couple of pals. These guys have worked out how to measure the “beauty” of specific locations within cities and then designed an algorithm that automatically chooses a route between two locations in a way that maximizes the beauty along it. “The goal of this work is to automatically suggest routes that are not only short but also emotionally pleasant,” they say."
Forget the Shortest Route Across a City; New Algorithm Finds the Most Beautiful | MIT Technology Review
"It is a nostalgic time right now, and photographs actively promote nostalgia. Photography is an elegiac art, a twilight art. Most subjects photographed are, just by virtue of being photographed, touched with pathos. An ugly or grotesque subject may be moving because it has been dignified by the attention of the photographer. A beautiful subject can be the object of rueful feelings, because it has aged or decayed or no longer exists. All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt."
Susan Sontag, On Photography, 1977 (via memoryandmedia)
nevver:

Errol Morris

nevver:

Errol Morris

slaughterhouse90210:

“We don’t get to stay in moments and that should not be news to you. We are both familiar with the concept of time, the awful math of it, how our history always gets larger, less understandable, overweight, overworked, over and over, and memories get misfiled and complicate feelings for no good reason and some people seem more able to deal with this, to keep their histories clean and well ordered but I still don’t understand why we came unstuck from those moments we wanted to stay and why the moments we wanted to forget still haunt us.” —Catherine Lacey, Nobody Is Ever Missing

slaughterhouse90210:

“We don’t get to stay in moments and that should not be news to you. We are both familiar with the concept of time, the awful math of it, how our history always gets larger, less understandable, overweight, overworked, over and over, and memories get misfiled and complicate feelings for no good reason and some people seem more able to deal with this, to keep their histories clean and well ordered but I still don’t understand why we came unstuck from those moments we wanted to stay and why the moments we wanted to forget still haunt us.”
—Catherine Lacey, Nobody Is Ever Missing